Trekking in companionship of mountain dogs

Trekking in companionship of mountain dogs

This was a short journey to view the Triund in Himachal Pradesh, India. During the journey, I came across many dogs who trekked along to reach the top along with a small group of people. 

These dogs seemed to be well adjusted to the varying temperaments of fellow trekkers. They become friendly with people who caressed and fed them. Never bothered to get close to those people who may be afraid of them. 

They rested along with their group and if required stayed overnight near the camping site of the fellow trekkers.

These mountain dogs trekked back to the starting point of their group. This would also give them a chance to pick a new group for the arduous uphill journey. 

Evolutionary scientists will attribute this behaviour to survival. The strenuous journey gives them food out of affection of fellow trekkers. 

Well, these mountain dogs are social animals too. They are very friendly and reciprocating with the trekkers. The dogs pick your pace of climbing the hill. You are slow or fast they will follow you and they really deal with your physical stamina-good or bad…

If you find them trekking along with another group, they won’t give you much attention. They remain loyal to their group till the journey ends. You may caress or feed them but they would complete their journey with their own group. 

It’s like these four legged creatures telling you, ‘Honey, I’ll guide you. Just follow the trail’. 

Parenting and Pets

Parenting and Pets

My uncle was getting transferred abroad and his pet was now going to live with us. This was a female pomeranian adult, Terry. Beautiful, healthy with apparently no behavioral issues. Terry ate well, slept well and loved her walks. She formed a bond with dad and she had no hassle while adapting to a new home. Terry was a family for good seven years and she was truly a darling!

Seven years are no less to have an experience of a pet. However, bringing up a pup from its early days could be contrasting experience. I and my family are bringing up a German Shepherd, Loki. Parenting a human baby or a pup has its own share of happiness and hassles. Pet parents would agree with me… Right?

Loki was barely 40 days old playful pup who just loved to eat, sleep, pee, crap and chew furniture sides. He is on a search mission with mobile nostrils ever since he came to live with us.  Loki created a record of passing stools and urinating in every corner of the house. His favourites being his own mattress, carpets and doormats. Since he was a tiny-miny-cute-little pup we pardoned him. He just appeared to show this juvenile behavior for good two months. Loki just seemed to be an incarnation of a devil with some sort of sadistic intent.

Gradually, Loki stopped peeing in the bed room where he always slept. Thereafter, he stopped peeing in the living room where he met all the family members. There seems to be some pattern to this.

Loki is five months old now and he has spotted a corner in the balcony for his bio-breaks. And he has learned that it is ‘his home too’. It’s truly a good feel for a pet parent.

Well, there has been a blind spot. Loki urinated on one spot in the drawing room. This behavior occurred when he found the doors to the balcony closed. Also, this was an untouched area of the house. I mean, less used by his human friends.

This is my first ever book on animal behavior that I started reading after Loki came home. Patricia B. McConnell, an animal behaviorist in her book ‘The Other End of the Leash’ has given a beautiful chapter on olfactory sense of dogs. And I seemed to have been on the right chapter!

According to Patricia B. McConnell, “We define ‘house’ as bordered by walls, but most dogs seem to define ‘house’ where you spend your time and therefore where the pack’s scent is the strongest. Many of my client’s dogs only went in the back guest room, a place with none of the familiar odors of the family. In most of the cases, simply eliminating the odor of urine and then marking the area with a different scent can get the dog going in the right rest room again. Once the area if odor-free and clean, sit down with your dog and a paperback and spend a little time each day there. In just a few days, that place will smell like a living room instead of a toilet to your pup”.

I tried the trick mentioned by the author and it seems to have work wonders. Six days have gone past and there has been just two episodes when he crapped  in the drawing room. This is a good success rate!

Enjoying the book and so much so growing up with the pup.

I would share more of my experience that relate or unrelate with this beautiful work of Patricia B. McConnell.